If I put a gun to someone’s head, say, a 30-year-old healthy male, pull the trigger, and kill him, assuming an average life expectancy of, say, 84, you can argue that possibly 54 years of life [were] stolen from that person in a direct act of violence.

However, if a person is born into poverty in the midst of an abundant society where it is statistically proven that it would hurt no one to facilitate meeting the basic needs of that person and yet they die at the age of 30 due to heart disease, which has been found to statistically relate to those who endure the stress and effects of low socioeconomic status, is that death, the removal of those 54 years once again, an act of violence?

And the answer is ‘Yes, it is.’

You see, our legal system has conditioned us to think that violence is a direct behavioral act. The truth is that violence is a process, not an act, and it can take many forms.

You cannot separate any outcome from the system by which it is oriented.

Peter Joseph, from this lecture. (via universalequalityisinevitable)

this is so fuckin important

(via haha-killme)

Tara does a great deal of work to say still, and strong, and hold up those around her. She withstands assaults from within and from without. Tara is the earth. Tara is structure. (x)

(Source: bufflehane)

Another myth that is firmly upheld is that disabled people are dependent and non-disabled people are independent. No one is actually independent. This is a myth perpetuated by disablism and driven by capitalism - we are all actually interdependent. Chances are, disabled or not, you don’t grow all of your food. Chances are, you didn’t build the car, bike, wheelchair, subway, shoes, or bus that transports you. Chances are you didn’t construct your home. Chances are you didn’t sew your clothing (or make the fabric and thread used to sew it). The difference between the needs that many disabled people have and the needs of people who are not labelled as disabled is that non-disabled people have had their dependencies normalized. The world has been built to accommodate certain needs and call the people who need those things independent, while other needs are considered exceptional. Each of us relies on others every day. We all rely on one another for support, resources, and to meet our needs. We are all interdependent. This interdependence is not weakness; rather, it is a part of our humanity.
Looking back, what are your favorite memories of playing the character?
Crystal Reed: There’s this one really great scene that I had with Tyler; it was during season 2 and it was this forgettable, tiny, couple of minutes scene in an ice rink. It’s just a simple scene, but it’s so honest. I remember that day in particular being really connected to Tyler. It’s just my quintessential Scott and Allison scene. [x]

(Source: isacs-lahey)

lexiwestiiee:

gayreyna:

my question is if men are unable to control themselves in the presence of women why the hell are they allowed to control entire nations

*mic drop*

(Source: becqeurel)

(Source: my-eyes-open)

bourgeoisentimentality:

walk up in the club like “wow drag culture is more respected in queer circles than being a trans woman, i wish we could respect the lives of a subset of women more than we gawk over a game of dress up”

The portrayals of disabled people that are considered the best, those that win Oscars for able-bodied actors, are often described as being ‘sympathetic’ to disabled people. This supposes both that sympathy is what disabled people are seeking from the able-bodied and that it is the best we can hope to get from a filmed depiction of our lives. We do not want sympathy. We want equality.

ABLE-BODIED ACTORS AND DISABILITY DRAG: WHY DISABLED ROLES ARE ONLY FOR DISABLED PERFORMERS

This is also true for cis actors in trans drag (*cough* jared leto *cough*).

(via disabilityhistory)